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Healthy People Build Healthy Communities


Kupona Foundation Annual Report 2016

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Healthy People Build Healthy Communities


Kupona Foundation Annual Report 2016

 

About Kupona Foundation

Kupona means "to heal" in Kiswahili. Kupona Foundation supporters unlock opportunities for vulnerable people living in poverty. Access to quality healthcare is the key.
 

A young girl being fitted with a prosthesis at CCBRT. Photo credit: Sala Lewis

A young girl being fitted with a prosthesis at CCBRT. Photo credit: Sala Lewis

At optimal health, individuals and their families thrive, breaking the cycle of poverty. Kupona mobilizes resources and builds strategic partnerships with individuals and institutions who share our passion for global health.

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Our collaborative partnership with a single, expert implementer allows us to deep dive into program design and organizational sustainability, and creates a rare opportunity for individuals and institutions to invest in direct, dynamic impact in the field. As an integrated part of CCBRT’s organizational fabric, Kupona operates with maximum transparency and context-driven agility, amplifying our community’s power to affect change.
 

CCBRT's Reach in Tanzania - 2016

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Since 2009, Kupona has raised over $3.3 million to support treatment, training, capital projects and organizational development at CCBRT. In that time, CCBRT has provided over 75,000 life changing surgeries and over 570,000 clinical consultations for people living with correctable impairments, and, through training and capacity building efforts, has supported the safe delivery of over 490,000 babies.

 
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2016 at a Glance


Your impact builds healthy communities

2016 at a Glance


Your impact builds healthy communities

 
 

100th woman empowered with vocational training after recovering from fistula surgery

 
 

448 children newly enrolled in CCBRT’s clubfoot treatment program

 
 

Over 7,600 sight restoring surgeries for people with visual impairments

 
 

Over 75,000 safe deliveries for expectant mothers and their newborns at CCBRT partner sites

 
 

1,329 clinicians trained across specialties, including ophthalmology, obstetrics and gynecology, neonatology, anesthesia and physiotherapy

 
 

95% increase in new adopters of family planning

 
 

Over 1,000 women treated for obstetric fistula through CCBRT's holistic program

 

Letter from the Leadership

Dear Friends,

The statistics around global health challenges are staggering.

As of August 2016, there were 7.4 billion people in the world. Up to 5 billion people lack access to basic surgical services like safe anesthesia, surgery for correctable impairments, or C-sections. Further estimates suggest that 2 million women and girls worldwide are living with an untreated obstetric fistula as a result of prolonged obstructed labor. 90% of these women and girls lost their baby in the traumatic delivery, and now silently suffer with incontinence, outcast by their communities. Globally, a mother still dies every two minutes during pregnancy or childbirth: that's 303,000 women every year.

These are big numbers that trigger a very common reaction in many of us: how on earth can I do anything about that? Kupona presents an opportunity for individuals and institutions in the United States to take action.

Through Kupona, members of our community make a constructive contribution to CCBRT, an organization with more than two decades of experience in providing high quality healthcare services and a proven track record of impact. In 2016, we have seen a growing number of people seize this opportunity. Our community mobilized over $1.1 million in financial and in kind resources to support the continuation and sustainable growth of our work.

The financial and in kind resources mobilized by the Kupona community enable the continued provision of high quality, comprehensive healthcare services to thousands of people every year, helping to unlock their potential and empowering them to build brighter futures for themselves and their families.

In 2016, Kupona and CCBRT also worked together to lay the foundation for a sustainable future for CCBRT’s services. As demand continues to increase, the Kupona community will play a critical role in ensuring CCBRT can continue to evolve and make the strategic investments in infrastructure, training and capacity building, and systems necessary to sustain its services for future generations.

We look to 2017 aware of the challenges that lie ahead, but excited by the opportunity we have to protect and increase the availability of high quality, comprehensive healthcare services for the most vulnerable communities. Please, join us in seizing this opportunity today.

Thank you so much for your support.

Abbey Kocan
Executive Director, Kupona Foundation

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Erwin Telemans
CEO, CCBRT

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Finances

Summary of Expenses

Program Spending Allocation

Our independently audited financial statements show that 9 out of every 10 dollars we spend are invested in programs and services for people living in poverty in Tanzania.


Governance

Members of our Board of Directors, Advisory Board and staff

Members of our Board of Directors, Advisory Board and staff

Board of Directors 2016 ↓

  • Dr. Yoni Barnhard
  • Dr. John Brothers, President
  • Mira Dewji (joined December 2016)
  • Steven Hatfield
  • James Mann, Vice President
  • Robert Schwed
  • Adrian Stewart

Advisory Board 2016 ↓

  • Alexandra Esparza, Chair
  • Kristy Bohling
  • Alison Carlman
  • Adam Chadroff
  • Jameel Farruk
  • Rohan Mehta
  • Dr. Jaymie Ang Henry
  • Elena Rubinov
  • Nick Smoot
  • Dr. Sierra Washington
  • Tyler Woebkenberg

Celebrating Our Community

In 2016, the Kupona community mobilized over $1.1 million in financial and in kind resources to enable the continuation and sustainable growth of life changing programs.


Thank you to every member of our community who supported our work in 2016. You donated dollars, time, and photos. You climbed mountains, hosted pasta dinners, and dedicated your wedding and baby registries to Kupona. You golfed for good, purchased handmade items from The Mabinti Centre and artwork from the Drawing Out Fistula Exhibition. You attended and supported cocktail receptions, meetings, and mixers, raised awareness, and shared our story on social media.

You were a passionate force for good, and we are so grateful for your support.

Our special thanks goes to:

Organizational Supporters ↓

  • Allen & Overy LLP
  • Buy1Give1
  • Contractors Sales
  • Cravath, Swaine & Moore LLP
  • DA Collins Construction Co., Inc.
  • Direct Relief
  • Dr. Heidi Flagg and Spring OBGYN
  • Drilling for Hope Fund of The Community Foundation of the Greater Capital Region
  • ESMI of New York
  • Fistula Foundation
  • Fulham College Boys' School
  • GE Foundation
  • GlobalGiving
  • Goldman, Sachs & Co Matching Gift Program
  • Gorman Bros.
  • HMA Contracting
  • Hoffman & Edgette, Inc.
  • Iron Roost, Inc.
  • Johnson & Johnson Family of Companies
  • Karibu Kikoy LLC
  • Lancaster Development Inc.
  • Malta Development Co., Inc.
  • Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT)
  • Mayer Brown LLP
  • Munter Enterprises
  • PeriGen
  • Pet Partners
  • Polyset
  • Princeton in Africa
  • Quidoo Consulting
  • Saratoga National Golf Club
  • Salesforce Foundation
  • Silicon Valley Community Foundation
  • Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP
  • St. Therese College VZW
  • Smile Train
  • Sotheby's International Reality
  • Spa Cascada
  • TD Advisors
  • The Saratoga Hospital
  • VMware
  • Vodafone Americas Foundation
  • Women's Global Giving Fund of the Community Foundation of the Greater Capital Region
  • WonderWork

Individual Supporters ↓

  • Pamela Armstrong-Manchester and Avery Manchester
  • Rhoda and Dr. Bob Barnhard Charitable Fund
  • Dr. Yoni Barnhard
  • Dr. Mark Barone
  • Matthew & Julia Beebe
  • Lien and Anton Blinkoff
  • Kristine Bohling
  • Pieter Bonnemaijer
  • Mark Boon
  • Melinda Bostwick
  • Dr. John Brothers
  • Nick Burlingame
  • Alexandra Cairns
  • Alison and Terry Cairns
  • Alison Carlman
  • Allen Chan
  • Carolyn Chandler
  • Cynthia Childs and Rolf Orsagh
  • Lynne Clark
  • Michael and Karylene Close
  • Drs. Tomas and Carmela Cordero
  • Michael and Ruth Crotty
  • Patricia D'Agostino
  • Leslie L. Davidson
  • Edward J. Davis
  • Mira Dewji
  • Danelle Dommer
  • Alice Eskins
  • Paige Fleming
  • Lori Florian
  • Anthony Fuller
  • Elizabeth Gilbert
  • Paul Glist
  • Timothy Godfrey
  • Claude Goetz
  • Josh Goldfein
  • Steven Greenwald
  • Steve Griffen
  • Diego Gutierrez
  • Steven Hatfield
  • Peter Haylock
  • The Heise Family
  • David Hill
  • Leslie Jucovics
  • Rohan K. Mehta
  • Joyce Kafanabo
  • Elizabeth D. Keating
  • George Kevlin
  • Chris and Tammy Kita
  • Abbey and Michael Kocan
  • Mark and Linda Kocan
  • Victor Kovner
  • Merila Latterell
  • Reggie Lenoir and Sheila Wofsy
  • Jonathan Lewis
  • Charles and Deborah Llewellyn
  • Lynn Loacker
  • Tom Longe
  • Akira Maeda
  • James H. Mann
  • Devika Mathrani
  • Hugh McCullough
  • Mira Mehes
  • Julie Miller
  • Joanne Moore
  • Ronald G. Morris
  • Paige Navarro
  • Timothy Ostrander
  • David Parkes
  • Conrad Person
  • Dan Polidore
  • Patricia H Potts
  • John and Louise Riber
  • Ronald Richards
  • Anne Robinson
  • Elena Rubinov
  • Ramon Sandovall III
  • Lee and Linda Schiller
  • Martha Schrader
  • Zachary Schwan
  • Robert Schwed
  • Mary Shatzer
  • Steve and Debby Seaboyer
  • Adrian Stewart and Tara Cohen-Stewart
  • Marquise Stillwell and Randi Zinn
  • Dr. Laura Swash
  • Matt Tannin
  • Erwin Telemans
  • George Thompson
  • Scot and Jennifer Tucker
  • Kathleen and Brian Vieira
  • Tyler Woebkenberg
  • Ed Yelochan
 
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Empowering People with Disabilities


Improving access to quality, specialist surgery & rehabilitation 

Empowering People with Disabilities


Improving access to quality, specialist surgery & rehabilitation 

 

The Challenge

Estimates suggest that 3.5 million people in Tanzania live with a disability, but the availability of specialist care is seriously limited.

A member of the CCBRT team preparing for surgery.                   Photo credit: Sala Lewis

A member of the CCBRT team preparing for surgery.                   Photo credit: Sala Lewis

Tanzania has 5.2 clinical health workers per 10,000 people, one-fifth of the optimal ratio recommended by the World Health Organization.

Tanzania has 177 specialist surgeons – that’s 0.36 per 100,000 people. The Lancet Commission target is 20-40.

The ratio of ophthalmologists to population is 0.8:1 million, far short of the Vision 2020 target of 4 ophthalmologists per million.


The Solution

 
 

In 2016, the Kupona community invested in comprehensive treatment and rehabilitation for adults and children with disabilities, training of healthcare providers in specialist fields, and infrastructure improvements to enhance the quality of care available to the people we serve.

Life-saving training at CCBRT. Photo credit:

Life-saving training at CCBRT. Photo credit:

Supporting parents and their children in the community. Photo credit: Sala Lewis

Supporting parents and their children in the community. Photo credit: Sala Lewis

Music therapy sessions with women recovering from obstetric fistula.                 Photo credit: Sala Lewis

Music therapy sessions with women recovering from obstetric fistula.                 Photo credit: Sala Lewis


Serve

CCBRT is the largest provider of disability and rehabilitative services in Tanzania, providing comprehensive, specialist care that is accessible for every patient regardless of their ability to pay. CCBRT is one of only three providers of pediatric ophthalmology services nationwide, is one of the largest providers of comprehensive treatment for obstetric fistula in the world, and is a leader in the field of reconstructive surgery.

Waiting for orthopedic surgery. Photo credit: Sala Lewis

Waiting for orthopedic surgery. Photo credit: Sala Lewis

Vocational training at the Mabinti Centre. Photo credit: Sala Lewis

Vocational training at the Mabinti Centre. Photo credit: Sala Lewis

IN 2016:

CCBRT saw over 67,800 patients at its Disability Hospital for a range of interventions.

CCBRT provided nearly 11,000 surgeries at its Disability Hospital and 8 partner sites, including over 7,600 sight restoring surgeries for people with visual impairments.

CCBRT provided comprehensive treatment for over 1,000 women with obstetric fistula.

The 100th woman graduated from the Mabinti Centre, CCBRT’s socioeconomic empowerment program for women recovering from obstetric fistula.

CCBRT enrolled 448 new children in its clubfoot treatment program.

CCBRT performed reconstructive surgery for 169 children with burn related injuries, restoring their mobility and reducing scars.


Read Case Study: Aden ↓

Soon after Aden was born, his parents noticed his feet turned downward. Aden’s three older siblings were not born with the condition, and his parents had never seen a baby with clubfoot before. They were not sure what to do, and feared how the impairment would affect Aden’s mobility and growth.

To their great relief, doctors referred Aden to CCBRT. Aden was just 10-days-old when he visited CCBRT’s Disability Hospital for the first time. Aden’s mother remembers being impressed with how diligently the nurses got to work. They did not delay in starting Aden’s first casting, the first step of the clubfoot correction process.

Treatment for clubfoot is a lengthy process, requiring long term commitment from both a child’s family and clinicians to ensure a good outcome. After Aden’s second casting one week later, the doctor prescribed two more rounds of casting.

One month after Aden’s first visit, his mother and nurses were thrilled to see his progress. They decided he should progress from casting to braces, what Aden’s mother calls his “clubfoot shoes”. The clinicians taught Mama Aden how to fasten the shoes and advised her to return to clinic every week as Aden’s feet adjusted.

The impact of the braces on Aden’s feet was apparent at his subsequent appointment. “The change is very big and we are so happy!” said Mama Aden, beaming. The improvement was so drastic that Aden was already eligible for the next stage of braces.

CCBRT and Aden’s relationship will continue to grow for years to come. The team that treated him as a newborn will monitor his progress throughout his life, making sure he has the mobility and freedom to explore his new world.


Train

The volume and range of patients treated by CCBRT each year makes CCBRT Disability Hospital an ideal training ground for clinicians. As a specialist facility, CCBRT is committed to building the skills of other disability care providers, with the aim of decentralizing quality care. The average patient in Tanzania lives 74 miles from a facility that can provide surgery, a journey which, given poor transportation infrastructure, can take 6+ hours to complete.

Add to that the high cost of transportation to quality clinics, bringing quality care closer to communities is critical to improving the accessibility of healthcare. In 2016, CCBRT trained 1,329 clinicians in a range of specialities including: ophthalmology, obstetric fistula surgery, anesthesia, and physiotherapy. Kupona also partnered with ReSurge International and Johnson & Johnson to build capacity for reconstructive surgery in Tanzania, securing funds for a reconstructive surgery training camp in Itigi, Tanzania. This effort strengthened the surgical skills of nine clinicians, including five CCBRT colleagues, through 63 hours of hands on surgical training.


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Read Case Study: Erika ↓

Erika lives with her family on the outskirts of Dar es Salaam, Tanzania’s largest city. When Erika was five-years-old, she started to complain to her mother about a pain in her eyes whenever she was in the sunshine. The pain got gradually worse, until Erika became extremely sensitive to light. Erika’s mother, Renata, had heard of CCBRT, a specialist provider of eye services. Renata took her daughter to the hospital, where doctors discovered Erika had a cataract, and would need surgery. Renata’s first instinct? Concern about how she was going to pay for the treatment: “My husband repairs cars, and I stay at home with the children. I was fearful that the little money we had would not be enough to pay for Erika’s surgery.”

CCBRT’s mission is to serve every patient in need, regardless of their ability to pay. The team immediately put Renata’s mind at rest: Erika’s surgery would be heavily subsidized. Erika was treated two days later. After Erika’s surgery, Renata said, “I want to send her to pre-school next year, and now I know she will be able to read just like her classmates. I know she will be a very bright student.”


Build

CCBRT Disability Hospital has served over 969,000 patients since it opened in 2001. As demand for services continues to grow, investments in infrastructure and equipment are critical to maintain and enhance the quality of care available to patients. In 2016, Kupona partners provided new equipment for the obstetric fistula and anesthesia departments, to ensure the safety and quality of surgeries.

The team at CCBRT also continued on their lean management journey in 2016, with the support of experts in the Kupona community, leveraging lean management principles to eliminate waste and improve efficiency.


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Read Case Study: Fina ↓

Fina is a 40-year-old farmer from Lake Victoria, in Tanzania’s far northwest corner. Fina was 24-years-old when she was pregnant with her first child. Her voice drops as she says, “I endured labor pains for three days. My husband called for a midwife who came to our home.” On the fourth day, Fina was still in intense pain, and increasingly weak and exhausted. Her husband tried to take her to a hospital, which was far from her village. They cycled to the bus station in another town, but when bus drivers saw Fina’s condition, they told her she couldn’t use the bus. After hours of waiting, a bus driver finally let them on and they traveled to the hospital where Fina gave birth. Her baby did not survive. “I cried a lot. It was a bad day.”

The next day, exhausted and grief-stricken, Fina and her husband went to his family’s home nearby, where she realized she was leaking urine. Fina was confused. “I didn’t know what was happening to me. I explained it to my mother-in-law, who took me to the hospital a week later.” The doctors Fina saw told her they couldn’t do anything to help. Back home at her in-laws’ house, the leaking continued and after a few days her mother-in-law told her to leave and go back to her family as she could not tolerate her condition any more. On hearing that his wife was leaking urine, Fina’s husband left her. She was alone and went back home to live with her father and stepmother. Fina’s father took her to a local hospital, where doctors wrote a referral note to another hospital further away. It was there that doctors explained to Fina that she had two holes between her birth canal, bladder and urinary tract, and admitted her for surgery to repair just one of the holes. Back at home, Fina’s stepmother was increasingly embarrassed by her stepdaughter’s condition and eventually forced Fina to leave the house. “I asked myself many questions. Where will I go? How am I going to survive? Neither my relatives nor my friends want to stay with me. I cried bitterly”, Fina said in a low voice.

Fina decided to take her future into her own hands. She sought employment as a cleaner. Despite her condition, she worked for three years, bought her own land and began to build a house. She began a career as a farmer. At a party in her village earlier this year, one of Fina’s neighbors asked her why she washed her clothes every day. Fina explained that she had been leaking urine since giving birth 16 years ago. Fina’s neighbor shared that her daughter had experienced the same problem, and received free surgery and treatment at CCBRT in Dar es Salaam. She gave Fina the number of a nurse who could put her in contact with a CCBRT ambassador. The next day, an ambassador received money for Fina’s bus trip to Dar es Salaam via M-PESA, a mobile money transfer system. In July 2016, Fina underwent surgery at CCBRT Disability Hospital to repair her fistula. It was successful and she is delighted: “I am so happy that I am recovering from fistula after suffering for all these years. I like the services and care I have received here. Asante (thank you) CCBRT and other supporters!”

 
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Prevention is Better than Cure


Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare

Prevention is Better than Cure


Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare

 

The Challenge

Tanzania is one of ten countries in the world that together contribute to 61% of global maternal deaths and 66% of global neonatal deaths. It is estimated that over 80% of these deaths could be prevented if pregnant women had access to comprehensive antenatal care, skilled birth attendants during delivery, and emergency obstetric care.

 

Improvements to the quality of maternal and newborn healthcare not only save lives, but are also the most effective way to prevent disability. For every woman that dies in childbirth in Tanzania, 20 more will develop an injury, infection or debilitating impairment. Each year, thousands of children are born with birth defects like cleft lip/palate and clubfoot in Tanzania. When these impairments aren't properly diagnosed and referred for treatment at birth, they can develop into a long-term disability, compounding the complexity of treatment and adversely affecting a child's development.

Dar es Salaam is Tanzania’s largest urban center, and one of the fastest growing cities in the world. The population of Dar es Salaam is currently 4.4 million, predicted to grow to over 6 million by 2025. The city's healthcare infrastructure was built to serve ~750,000. Healthcare facilities are being stretched to breaking point as demand for service grows. Despite the best efforts of frontline heath workers, shortages of skilled staff, critical gaps in equipment and supplies, and broken referral systems put the lives and welfare of women and newborns at serious risk.

CCBRT staff celebrating the progress of this healthy baby at a partner facility. Photo Credit: Sala Lewis

CCBRT staff celebrating the progress of this healthy baby at a partner facility. Photo Credit: Sala Lewis


The Solution

 
 

In 2016, Kupona Foundation supporters continued to invest in comprehensive efforts to improve the quality of maternal and newborn healthcare in Tanzania. Investments supported training and capacity building in Dar es Salaam's public healthcare facilities, preparations to open a new referral hospital for emergency and high risk deliveries, and the delivery of integrated services to address the unmet need for family planning.

CCBRT Maternity & Newborn Hospital, set to open in early 2019. Photo credit: Sala Lewis

CCBRT Maternity & Newborn Hospital, set to open in early 2019. Photo credit: Sala Lewis


Serve

Integrated family planning is one of the most effective ways to prevent maternal death, by reducing the number of unintended pregnancies and unsafe abortions that often result in maternal mortality and morbidity. For every $1 spent on family planning, $1.40 can be saved on the provision of safe maternal and newborn healthcare. Since 2014, Kupona’s community has been a driving force behind the provision of discreet family planning services at CCBRT Disability Hospital, in memory of Tim Manchester.

In 2016, CCBRT saw a 95% increase in the number of new acceptors of family planning methods at Tim’s Corner, CCBRT’s family planning clinic.

CCBRT also began to integrate family planning into its core disability services, with particular focus on women receiving treatment for obstetric fistula, who are most at risk for complications in future pregnancies. Now, a trained nurse provides a family planning consultation for every woman treated for fistula at CCBRT, helping her make safe, informed decisions about her reproductive future.


Read Case Study: Rhoda ↓

Now 23-years-old, Rhoda lives in Dar es Salaam. In 2011, she became pregnant for the first time. When she went into labor, Rhoda’s mother and father took her to a nearby hospital. Rhoda experienced complications, and the doctors and nurses were overwhelmed and unable to manage the complications. Rhoda was in labor for five days. Tragically, she lost her child during the delivery. As a result of the prolonged labor, Rhoda also developed a fistula. At first, she did not want to tell her mother, but eventually, she explained her condition to her family. They took her to another hospital to see if the doctors could help. A doctor told Rhoda that the fistula was caused by her stubbornness; he explained that she must have refused to be stitched after her delivery, as that was the only reason she could be living with a fistula. When she tells the story of this visit, Rhoda stops for a moment to collect herself, “My heart is beating so fast talking about it.”

Fortunately, another doctor in the hospital, Dr. Robert, was a member of CCBRT’s Maternal and Newborn Healthcare Capacity Building Program. Dr. Robert came to the hospital to see Rhoda. He explained that fistula is a treatable medical injury, and that she could receive surgery free of charge at CCBRT’s Disability Hospital. Rhoda was admitted to CCBRT’s Disability Hospital on a Friday. The following Monday, she received surgery to successfully repair her fistula.

When Rhoda was discharged from the Disability Hospital, CCBRT staff asked if she wanted to join the Mabinti Centre, where she would learn vocational skills like sewing, beading, and crochet, as well as business and English, in order to start her own business and become financially independent. Rhoda agreed to join the year-long training program, where she met other women who had recovered from fistula and who had learned how to become small business owners. Upon graduation from The Mabinti Centre, Rhoda began selling small bags and pouches at a market in Morogoro. When she became pregnant for the second time, she went to Amana Hospital, one of CCBRT’s 23 partner facilities, for an antenatal care appointment. There, she met Dr. Timothy, another member of CCBRT’s Capacity Building Program, who spoke with her about her medical history and ensured that she would have a safe and respectful delivery. Staff gave her a date for her Caesarean section delivery, required for all pregnant women who have a history of obstetric fistula. On the day of her delivery, the doctors insisted that Rhoda was first on the operating list, and she came out of surgery with a healthy baby boy, Jamil. Speaking of her experience at Amana Hospital, Rhoda says, “I am so grateful. They treated me so well, and I felt so special. Without the help of the doctors at Amana and at CCBRT, women like me who once had fistula would be lost in the village.”


Train

Since 2010, CCBRT has worked in partnership with the Regional Health Management Team in Dar es Salaam to build the capacity of public healthcare facilities to provide high quality obstetric and newborn care. In 2016, frontline clinical teams continued to experience high demand for services, conducting over 75,000 deliveries across 23 supported sites. This constitutes over 62% of all facility based deliveries in the Dar es Salaam region.

Training and on-the-job mentoring, equipment distribution and data management strengthening efforts also continued, empowering clinical teams to provide quality, respectful, comprehensive care to their patients. In 2016, the average quality of care score across supported sites was 77%, increased from a baseline of 10%. Today, mothers and babies face a better future in the Dar es Salaam region.

In supported sites from 2012 to date:

A mother's chance of survival has increased by 40%

The stillbirth rate has reduced by 14%

The premature baby survival rate has increased by 19%

A mother getting to know her newborn baby. Photo credit: Benjamin Eagle

A mother getting to know her newborn baby. Photo credit: Benjamin Eagle


Sister Intisar and team practicing safe newborn resuscitation. Photo Credit: Sala Lewis

Sister Intisar and team practicing safe newborn resuscitation. Photo Credit: Sala Lewis

Read Case Study: Sister Intisar ↓

Sister Intisar was inspired to pursue nursing when her grandmother became ill. "I studied hard and decided to do nursing because all in all, it's the patients that I wanted to serve". Intisar witnessed her first delivery when she was still in nursing school: "From that point on I knew I would be a midwife". After graduation Intisar was recruited to join CCBRT's Maternal and Newborn Healthcare Capacity Building Program team. Since then she has received training and mentorship from senior staff, and Intisar's skills have improved. “At first I didn't know how to do vacuum deliveries, but now I am very comfortable with them”.

During the yearly external Standards Based Measurement and Recognition (SBMR) assessment, Intisar received an astounding 100% in "assisting normal labor". CCBRT midwife trainer Dorcas noted, "Intisar is a champion of delivery and resuscitating newborns".

A case that stood out for Intisar was a woman who had previously miscarried and developed obstetric fistula. After receiving treatment at CCBRT, she became pregnant again. The mother kept asking her, "Will I get my baby? Will I get my baby?” At 38 weeks she went into labor in one of Dar es Salaam’s regional hospitals. Intisar worked with her colleagues to do everything they could, and the team eventually performed a C-section. "We got a lovely baby boy" Intisar reported, smiling. "When I get a healthy baby I always clap and cheer, I just can't help myself!" She reflected, "I want all mothers to have safe respectful care. I want every mother to enjoy giving birth - not regard it as a punishment". When asked about her dreams for maternal and newborn health in Tanzania, Intisar quietly declared, "Seriously, I want zero deaths".


Build

In parallel to efforts to strengthen the capacity of existing facilities in Dar es Salaam, CCBRT is building a new maternity and newborn hospital to bring an additional 200 beds to the region. The hospital will offer comprehensive care for women with high risk pregnancies and sick newborns, with particular focus on pregnant women with a disability, pregnant adolescents younger than 16 years, and pregnant women with a history of fistula. The 200-bed facility is projected to deliver 12,000 babies annually.

This year, in-depth planning for the opening of the facility in 2018 continued. As Technical Advisors worked to develop detailed Standard Operating Procedures for the hospital, a number of clinical staff completed training, while others continue their enrollment in long-term training programs, ensuring the hospital can provide quality care from day one.


Esther resting with her newborn baby. Photo Credit: Sala Lewis

Esther resting with her newborn baby. Photo Credit: Sala Lewis

Read Case Study: Esther ↓

23-year-old Esther lives very close to the Buguruni Health Center in Dar es Salaam. Buguruni has an impressive track record of quality improvement: before CCBRT’s capacity building activities began, it scored 12% on the baseline Standards Based Management Recognition assessment, but it now scores 95%. Esther is very happy with the transformation in Buguruni’s services and standards. She rests with her newborn baby daughter, delivered at Buguruni the day before. Her first-born son was also delivered at the facility. She is delighted with her treatment there and the services provided: “The nurses here are so humble. I attend clinics here and they provide medicine as well. Here there is proper education for pregnant women: it is very freeing to be empowered with knowledge. I would love it if my new daughter became a teacher one day, but first I must decide on a name!”

 
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Amplifying the Story


Mobilizing support & building partnerships

Amplifying the Story


Mobilizing support & building partnerships

 

As global citizens, we are proud to participate in international, multi-sector discussions in pursuit of real solutions to the challenges facing our international community.

Our participation in conferences and events throughout the year gives us opportunities to build partnerships with organizations and individuals who share our passion for global health. Turning talk into action, we also use storytelling to mobilize a growing community of Kupona supporters. From digital engagement and art exhibitions, to golf tournaments and cocktail receptions, our activities in the United States take on many different forms, all with one common theme: to shine a spotlight on the causes we champion, and to show individuals and institutions how they can play a tangible role in empowering people and communities living in poverty to realize their full potential.


Women Deliver 2016

In May, members of the Kupona team attended the Women Deliver conference in Copenhagen, Denmark.


As a team passionate about global health, we were excited to see causes close to our hearts, including maternal and newborn healthcare, obstetric fistula and access to safe surgery, have more than one moment in the spotlight. As fundraisers, we were challenged to look at philanthropy and partnership in new ways. As women, we were empowered by the wave of support for the future development of our global community.

Alex with our good friend Kim from Johnson & Johnson

Alex with our good friend Kim from Johnson & Johnson

Celebrating Johnson & Johnson's GBCHealth 2016 Women & Girls Business Action on Health Award with friends from Johnson & Johnson, Direct Relief and Freedom from Fistula Foundation

Celebrating Johnson & Johnson's GBCHealth 2016 Women & Girls Business Action on Health Award with friends from Johnson & Johnson, Direct Relief and Freedom from Fistula Foundation

Abbey reflecting on our work for women and girls with Girls' Globe

Abbey reflecting on our work for women and girls with Girls' Globe


Ending Fistula Within a Generation

On May 23rd, International Day to End Obstetric Fistula, the UN Secretary General called for an end to fistula within a generation. Two days later, we celebrated the launch of our Drawing Out Obstetric Fistula art exhibition at the New York University Kimmel Center.


The drawings, by artist Dr. Jac Saorsa, shine a spotlight on the silent tragedy of obstetric fistula and are a celebration of the resilience, courage and unadulterated beauty of the women who inspired the collection. Every woman featured in the artwork was treated through our program in Tanzania, and every woman has her own story of survival. Obstetric fistula is both treatable and preventable, and the exhibition has prompted clinicians, philanthropists, advocates, lawyers, business leaders, artists and students to come together to discuss how we can answer the UN Secretary General’s call. Our sincere thanks go to exhibition sponsors Johnson & Johnson, UNFPA, and New York University who helped make our vision for this project a reality, and to Fistula Foundation for curating the online Resilience Gallery in support of this initiative.

Artist Jac Saorsa with guests at the Drawing Out Obstetric Fistula exhibition opening at NYU. Photo credit: Todd Plitt

Artist Jac Saorsa with guests at the Drawing Out Obstetric Fistula exhibition opening at NYU. Photo credit: Todd Plitt

“Not only does the artist capture the transformative power of a successful surgery, but also the inherent stigma-busting power of a woman who is unafraid to tell her story as someone living with or having lived with a fistula.”

- Zack Langway

'Yellow', charcoal and ink, Jac Saorsa 2015

'Yellow', charcoal and ink, Jac Saorsa 2015

The Kupona Foundation team (left to right) Abbey, Alex and Sami. Photo credit: Todd Plitt

The Kupona Foundation team (left to right) Abbey, Alex and Sami. Photo credit: Todd Plitt

Artist Jac Saorsa discussing her work with guests.                         Photo credit: Todd Plitt

Artist Jac Saorsa discussing her work with guests.                         Photo credit: Todd Plitt

“For those of us who believe that art has a place in society beyond the aesthetic, this collection of striking pieces by Jac Saorsa merits attention. It sheds light – and hope – on women whose very existence is barely recognized in mainstream narratives.”

- Mira Dewji

Kupona Foundation advisors, staff and supporters enjoying the exhibition. Photo credit: Todd Plitt

Kupona Foundation advisors, staff and supporters enjoying the exhibition. Photo credit: Todd Plitt

“I am an art lover, so understand the power of art on our consciousness. I also know how hard it is to discuss obstetric fistula. I think the art show, arranged by Kupona, is a fabulous forum to raise the consciousness of the public to this tragic condition – in a way that is beautiful, meaningful, yet not ‘in your face’ and confrontational.”

- Kim Keller


Joining the Global Safe Surgery Movement

In 2016, Kupona and CCBRT became joint members of the G4 Alliance. We have supported international surgical and anesthesia advocacy efforts for the last 4 years, and this membership formalizes the part we play in building political priority for surgical, obstetric, trauma and anesthesia care as part of the global development agenda.  As members of the G4 Alliance, we aim to bring CCBRT’s experience as a local surgical care provider to the table and to amplify clinical perspectives as our international community works together to improve the quality of surgical and anesthesia care worldwide.

A CCBRT surgeon performs a cleft lip repair. Photo credit: Sala Lewis

A CCBRT surgeon performs a cleft lip repair. Photo credit: Sala Lewis

 
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Looking Ahead


Seizing more opportunities in 2017

Looking Ahead


Seizing more opportunities in 2017

In 2017, we will continue to tackle some of the biggest challenges facing people and communities in Tanzania as they try to access safe, high quality healthcare. With your support we can leverage a powerful combination of expertise, creativity and partnerships to unlock opportunity for the people and communities we serve.

$160 will help a child with clubfoot walk and play

$300 will help a child to see the world around them

$535 will deliver a healthy baby to a healthy mother

$700 will help a woman with fistula rebuild her life